If you're attempting to replicate scientific research, you're awesome

If you're attempting to replicate scientific research, you're awesome

Vox has an article up about the recent fraud by Michael LaCour in his "study" featuring gay canvassers.

It contains this tidbit about David Broockman who exposed the fraud:

Broockman was consistently told by friends and advisers to keep quiet about his concerns lest he earn a reputation as a troublemaker, or — perhaps worse — someone who merely replicates and investigates others’ research rather than plant a flag of his own.

I have to say that someone who "merely" replicates studies is super awesome in my eyes.  This probably stems from my interest in meta-science…science about science…but someone out there replicating research and making science better is my hero.

How the biggest fraud in political science nearly got missed
Why power dynamics and poorly designed incentive structures in science could have caused a recently retracted Science article to stay on the record.

It's pretty frustrating that an introverts preferred state of being is often…

It's pretty frustrating that an introverts preferred state of being is often interpreted as snobbishness or some other negative statement about the relationship between the introverted person and others.

Additionally, it's frustrating when an introvert explains that this isn't the case and it's taken as if there's something wrong with the introvert. 

Using the Windows uploader app:

I had it show a dozen or so files that failed to upload, but I accidentally clicked "dismiss" instead of trying again.

Will the uploader try those again at some point?  It's in the middle of uploading 11,000 photos and videos but I have no idea which ones it was that failed…

IsaacAsimovTrue30yearsagotruenow..jpgimgmax1024

In not-surprising-news-about-religion:

In what may be the largest study ever conducted on changes in Americans’ religious involvement, researchers led by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean M. Twenge found that millennials are the least religious generation of the last six decades, and possibly in the nation’s history.

The Least Religious Generation – ScienceBlog.com
May 28, 2015 | ScienceBlog.com In what may be the largest study ever conducted on changes in Americans’ religious involvement, researchers led by San Diego State University psychology professor Jean …

The floating turd mystery that still haunts NASA
46 years later, it’s still unsolved.

Cryonics

This is pretty interesting stuff.  It will be exciting to see any replication attempts.

Persistence of Long-Term Memory in Vitrified and Revived C. elegans

Abstract follows with some paragraph breaks because abstracts are always so dense!

Can memory be retained after cryopreservation? Our research has attempted to answer this long-standing question by using the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a well-known model organism for biological research that has generated revolutionary findings but has not been tested for memory retention after cryopreservation.

Our study’s goal was to test C. elegans’ memory recall after vitrification and reviving. Using a method of sensory imprinting in the young C. elegans we established that learning acquired through olfactory cues shapes the animal’s behavior and the learning is retained at the adult stage after vitrification.

Our research method included olfactory imprinting with the chemical benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO) for phase-sense olfactory imprinting at the L1 stage, the fast cooling SafeSpeed method for vitrification at the L2 stage, reviving, and a chemotaxis assay for testing memory retention of learning at the adult stage. Our results in testing memory retention after cryopreservation show that the mechanisms that regulate the odorant imprinting (a form of long-term memory) in C. elegans have not been modified by the process of vitrification or by slow freezing.

Also, this journal does not seem to get along with Google+'s scraping of links as seen in the below error message.  

#cryonics  

Embedded Link

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie
An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. Setting Your Browser to Accept Cookies. There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons …

I've noticed a trend that seems new-ish to me in articles on the web:

A list of tweets other people made about the articles subject.

These are dumb.  Stop doing it article writers.  Why the heck should anyone care what a random selection of twitter users had to say about the subject of the article?  

Just stop.

This story reminded me of something John Cavil said on Battlestar Gallactica:

Reshared post from +Dustin Wyatt

This story reminded me of something John Cavil said on Battlestar Gallactica:

I don’t want to be human. I want to see gamma rays, I want to hear X-rays, and I want to smell dark matter. Do you see the absurdity of what I am? I can’t even express these things properly, because I have to — I have to conceptualize complex ideas in this stupid, limiting spoken language, but I know I want to reach out with something other than these prehensile paws, and feel the solar wind of a supernova flowing over me. I’m a machine, and I can know much more, I could experience so much more, but I’m trapped in this absurd body.

From the article:

She’s also a tetrachromat, which means that she has more receptors in her eyes to absorb color. The difference lies in Antico's cones, structures in the eyes that are calibrated to absorb particular wavelengths of light and transmit them to the brain. The average person has three cones, which enables him to see about one million colors. But Antico has four cones, so her eyes are capable of picking up dimensions and nuances of color—an estimated 100 million of them—that the average person cannot. “It’s shocking to me how little color people are seeing,” she said.

This Woman Sees 10 Times More Colors Than The Average Person
A unique genetic mutation and a well-wired brain mean that Concetta Antico is like no other artist on Earth.

The rule that human beings seem to follow is to engage the brain only when all else…

The rule that human beings seem to follow is to engage the brain only when all else fails – and usually not even then.

David Hull, Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science